Top Democratic pollster advised Biden campaign to pick Warren as VP

One of the Democratic Party’s top pollsters gave a presentation to senior members of former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police Trump finalizing executive order calling on police to use ‘force with compassion’ The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden campaign goes on offensive against Facebook MORE’s presidential campaign earlier this month making the case that Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Joint Chiefs chairman says he regrets participating in Trump photo-op | GOP senators back Joint Chiefs chairman who voiced regret over Trump photo-op | Senate panel approves 0B defense policy bill Trump on collision course with Congress over bases with Confederate names MORE (D-Mass.) would provide the most upside as Biden’s running mate.

Stanley Greenberg, who advised the presidential campaigns of both former President Clinton and former Vice President Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreCNN coronavirus town hall to feature science author David Quammen, ‘Empire’ actress Taraji Henson Top Democratic pollster advised Biden campaign to pick Warren as VP Melania Trump to appear on CNN coronavirus town hall Thursday night MORE, presented a 14-deck slide to the Biden campaign detailing how the likely Democratic nominee needs to grow his support among young people and Democrats who did not support him during the primary.

The presentation warned that the biggest threat the Democrats face in 2020 is the “lack of support and disengagement of millennials and the fragmentation of non-Biden primary voters.”

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Greenberg concluded that the intensity of support around Warren’s messages on corruption in Washington and an economy that is rigged against the middle class would help Biden win over remaining persuadable voters, while also rallying the left flank of the party behind his nomination.

“Senator Warren is the obvious solution,” Greenberg concluded in the presentation, which was obtained by The Hill. The presentation was first reported by Politico. 

The data Greenberg presented found Biden leading President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote Warren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases Esper orders ‘After Action Review’ of National Guard’s role in protests MORE 47 percent to 42 percent in interviews with registered voters across 16 battleground states, a slight decrease from April, when Greenberg found Biden with a 48 to 41 lead.

The poll found Biden leading by 8 points on the question of who is best equipped to manage the pandemic. But 53 percent of voters in the poll said they trust Trump on the question of who would do a better job at getting people back to work — a potentially crucial metric as the economy begins to open up.

Greenberg argued that a lack of support from young people and from Democrats who did not cast ballots for Biden in the primary is a major outstanding issue for the campaign.

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Ninety-four percent of those who voted for Biden in the primary say they’ll vote for him in the general election.

But only 79 percent of people who supported Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill’s 12:30 Report: Milley apologizes for church photo-op Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk Biden courts younger voters — who have been a weakness MORE’s (I-Vt.) presidential campaign said they’d vote for Biden, compared to 11 percent who said they’d vote for Trump.

And only 73 percent of those who voted for someone besides Biden and Sanders in the primary said they will support Biden in the general election, compared to 17 percent who said Trump.

Greenberg also found that voter apathy toward Biden’s core messages of restoring the middle class and rebuilding America’s standing in the world was dampening enthusiasm for him among young millennials.

The poll found Biden leading Trump by 17 points among millennials, with 10 percent of millennials saying they’d vote third party. Some members of former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWhite House accuses Biden of pushing ‘conspiracy theories’ with Trump election claim Biden courts younger voters — who have been a weakness Trayvon Martin’s mother Sybrina Fulton qualifies to run for county commissioner in Florida MORE’s presidential campaign blamed soft support from millennials on her 2016 loss. Exit polls found Clinton winning millennials by 17 points.

Greenberg made the case that the best way for Biden to win over non-Biden primary voters and young people is to add Warren to the ticket.

Warren’s message also resonates with Hispanics and white unmarried women, whom Greenberg identified as demographic groups where Biden still has potential upside support.

The veteran pollster tested Warren’s core messages of anti-corruption and anti-rigged economy and found those messages polled “off the charts” among the voters that Biden needs to reach.

“The Biden messages are competitive with Trump messages, but do not win intense support, and they are weaker than the Warren messages on corruption and rigged politics and the messages on working families,” Greenberg wrote.

“Warren’s corruption and rigged politics messages poll off the chart with non-Biden voters and millennials. Warren’s reform messages are also dominant with Biden’s ‘winnable voters,’ white working class women, and independents.”

The Biden campaign is in the midst of an intense vetting process as it seeks to pair the presumptive nominee with a female running mate.

In addition to Warren, the Biden campaign is reportedly vetting Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police Democrats demand Republican leaders examine election challenges after Georgia voting chaos Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk MORE (D-Minn.) and Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisRand Paul introduces bill to end no-knock warrants The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden campaign goes on offensive against Facebook McEnany says Juneteenth is a very ‘meaningful’ day to Trump MORE (D-Calif.), as well as former Georgia state House Rep. Stacey Abrams (D), New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan GrishamMichelle Lynn Lujan GrishamGeorge Floyd’s death ramps up the pressure on Biden for a black VP Biden should name a ‘team of colleagues’ Top Democratic pollster advised Biden campaign to pick Warren as VP MORE (D), Rep. Val DemingsValdez (Val) Venita DemingsHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police The Hill’s Coronavirus Report: Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas says country needs to rethink what ‘policing’ means; US cases surpass 2 million with no end to pandemic in sight Democrats press Intel chief for answers on foreign efforts to exploit US racial tensions MORE (D-Fla.) and others.

Biden said at a fundraiser on Wednesday night that he hopes to have made a final decision by Aug. 1, about two weeks before the Democratic nominating convention in August.

Biden said he’s looking for someone he’s comfortable with, rather than an ideological ally.

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