Muller uses Liverpool transfer to hint at Bayern Munich exit

Thomas Muller says there would be “no shame” in him leaving Bayern Munich in the summer like Thiago Alcantara did when he moved to Liverpool.

The Germany international has spent his entire career at Bayern, having joined the club’s youth ranks in 2000 as an 11-year-old he progressed to the senior side in 2008.

Since then he has gone on to win nine Bundesliga titles, six German Cups and two Champions League titles for Bayern, while he also lifted the World Cup with Germany in 2014.


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The 31-year-old – who has been linked with a move to Manchester United in the past – has played for Bayern for 13 years now but he reckons it would be “no problem at all” if he chose to leave the German side in the summer.

“I’m not fixed to this club,” Muller told The Times. “I have a special relationship, I love Bayern before I started playing for them, but when there is a situation where you have to decide maybe to play for a different club it would be no shame and no problem at all.

“Maybe like with Thiago [Alcantara, now at Liverpool].”

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Bayern could face favourites Manchester City in the Champions League semi-finals if they can overcome Paris Saint-Germain in the quarter-finals and Pep Guardiola’s side beat Borussia Dortmund.

When asked if he was surprised that City hadn’t won the Champions League yet, Muller added: “A team with Guardiola is always in shape to win it. But the problem is in the knockout stage you have only two games and many crazy things can happen.

“It is more random than in 38 games like the Premier League. In the last two years, Liverpool was amazing but normally a good team with Guardiola wins the league, for sure.

 

“The way he prepares his teams, his team against smaller teams, he is the best. But when top teams play against each other, the difference is not big enough to put away the random facts.”

On the fuss over his playing style, Muller continued: “It can be coached, for sure. People make a bigger thing about it to explain to themselves or the rest of the football world that a player maybe with not a special physicality, skill, or dribbling skill, is so efficient.

“Maybe in my younger age, the people watch my game and maybe I score two goals and people ask how is that possible, so they try to make like a mythos, they build up something that is logical as special.

“Maybe one of my strengths is I do it again and again. I do my runs, these normal runs — every good striker or every attacking midfielder knows these runs are very dangerous for the opponents’ defence — but some are not strong enough to do it 50 times. Maybe 49 times you don’t get the ball, or you lose it: football is a game of many, many mistakes, especially in attacking.

“So, we have to try it again, try it again, and maybe the defender makes a mistake at the 51st time, then you can score. [My game] is more logical than ‘a born talent’.”

 

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