Castro hits fundraising threshold for December debate

Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro’s presidential campaign announced Thursday it has hit the fundraising threshold for the December primary debate

“.@JulianCastro has hit the 200K donor threshold for the December debate,” Liza Acevedo, the Castro campaign’s deputy national press secretary, tweeted.

“Take note: Voters want to hear his vision and message for our country on stage. They want honesty. They want diversity. They want the entire game to be changed.”

To make the December debate, candidates have to amass the support of at least 200,000 unique donors and register support of 4 percent or more in four qualifying polls or 6 percent in two approved early voting state polls in Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada or South Carolina. 

ADVERTISEMENT

While Castro has successfully garnered 200,000 unique donors, he has not yet hit the polling threshold by the Dec. 12 deadline —– he has not scored higher than 2 percent in any polls for the December debate that were approved by the Democratic National Committee (DNC). 

Castro Thursday called for the DNC to revamp its presidential nominating process, saying that having the first two nominating contests in Iowa and New Hampshire, two overwhelmingly white states, fails to prioritize voters of color.

“I’m not asking for anyone to change the rules of the game in the middle of it. I want something much more meaningful than that. We need to change the whole game,” he said. “There’s no reason that Iowa and New Hampshire should go first — two states that hardly have any black people in them, any people of color.”

ADVERTISEMENT

So far six candidates have qualified for the December debate: former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police Trump finalizing executive order calling on police to use ‘force with compassion’ The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden campaign goes on offensive against Facebook MORE, Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Joint Chiefs chairman says he regrets participating in Trump photo-op | GOP senators back Joint Chiefs chairman who voiced regret over Trump photo-op | Senate panel approves 0B defense policy bill Trump on collision course with Congress over bases with Confederate names MORE (D-Mass.), Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill’s 12:30 Report: Milley apologizes for church photo-op Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk Biden courts younger voters — who have been a weakness MORE (I-Vt.), South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegScaled-back Pride Month poses challenges for fundraising, outreach Biden hopes to pick VP by Aug. 1 It’s as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process MORE, Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police Democrats demand Republican leaders examine election challenges after Georgia voting chaos Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk MORE (D-Minn.) and businessman Tom SteyerTom SteyerBloomberg wages war on COVID-19, but will he abandon his war on coal? Overnight Energy: 600K clean energy jobs lost during pandemic, report finds | Democrats target diseases spread by wildlife | Energy Dept. to buy 1M barrels of oil Ocasio-Cortez, Schiff team up to boost youth voter turnout MORE.

The issue of diversity in the Democratic 2020 primary field was thrust into the spotlight this week after Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisRand Paul introduces bill to end no-knock warrants The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden campaign goes on offensive against Facebook McEnany says Juneteenth is a very ‘meaningful’ day to Trump MORE (D-Calif.), who is of Indian and Jamaican descent, dropped out of the race, meaning that all of the candidates who have qualified for next month’s debate thus far are white. 

Entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangGeorge Floyd protests show corporations must support racial and economic equality Andrew Yang discusses his universal basic income pilot program Andrew Yang on the George Floyd protests in Minneapolis MORE and Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardGabbard drops defamation lawsuit against Clinton It’s as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process 125 lawmakers urge Trump administration to support National Guard troops amid pandemic MORE (D-Hawaii), are on the precipice of qualifying for the December debate, with each candidate needing one more qualifying poll to make the stage. 

Advocates have called for people to donate to Castro and Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerRand Paul introduces bill to end no-knock warrants Black lawmakers unveil bill to remove Confederate statues from Capitol Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk MORE (D-N.J.), who is black, to ensure that there is diversity among the 2020 Democratic candidates. 

“I’m a little angry, I have to say, that we started with one of the most diverse fields in our history, giving people pride,” Booker said in an interview with BuzzFeed News on Wednesday. “I don’t understand how we’ve gotten to this place where there’s more billionaires in the race than there are black people.”

Castro has raised $360,000 from 18,000 donors in the days after Harris’s withdrawal, with an average contribution of $20.

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *